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What impact has feminist victimology had on the growth of the victim movement? Illustrate your answer with particular reference to the response of the criminal justice system

An essay providing a critique of policy and practice underpinned by theoretical knowledge (3,500 words).

Learning Outcomes:

  • Analyse the theoretical perspectives of victimology
  • Evaluate the responses made by the criminal justice system to the victim.

Questions – choose one of the following questions:

3. What impact has feminist victimology had on the growth of the victim movement? Illustrate your answer with particular reference to the response of the criminal justice system.

Further Assessment Details

 

Level 5 Assessments:

Work at this level should illustrate that a student can generate ideas through the analysis of concepts at an abstract level. Students should be starting to be able to work with only limited supervision on directed tasks and should be showing a growing level of independence and autonomy. The work presented should show some level of detailed knowledge and some appreciation of where understanding is less well defined. The students should now be able to work in a number of different situations and recognise the techniques that each demands. As a consequence, work submitted should show an increased level of problem solving and critical thinking. Synthesis of ideas should be starting to emerge and markers can expect work that draws on more than one direction of evidence. The work should show a clear application to real contexts and an ability to evaluate alternative theoretical perspectives. The communication style should be starting to show adaptation to the situation in which that communication is located.

 

 

 

 

Sources

 

)

 

 

Reading list

 

Applied Victimology

Learning Resources: Updated July 2012

 

Essential Reading

Wolhuter, L; Olley, N. & Denham, D. (2009). Victimology: Victimisation and Victims’ Rights. London: Routledge

Available as an e-book from:

http://prism.talis.com/derbyac/items/883646?query=Victimology%3A+Victimisation+and+Victims%E2%80%99+Rights&resultsUri=items%3Fquery%3DVictimology%253A%2BVictimisation%2Band%2BVictims%25E2%2580%2599%2BRights%26facet%255B0%255D%3Ddisplayascollection%253A%2522eBooks%2522&facet%5B0%5D=displayascollection%3A%22eBooks%22

Core Reading

Goodey, J. (2005). Victims and victimology: Research, policy and practice. Harlow: Pearson.

Available as an e-book from:

http://prism.talis.com/derbyac/items/857773?query=Victims+and+victimology%3A+Research%2C+policy+and+practice&resultsUri=items%3Fquery%3DVictims%2Band%2Bvictimology%253A%2BResearch%252C%2Bpolicy%2Band%2Bpractice

Hall, Nathan, (2005). Hate crimes. Cullompton: Willan.

Available as an e-book from:

http://prism.talis.com/derbyac/items/760495?query=Hate+crimes.&resultsUri=items%3Fquery%3DHate%2Bcrimes.%2B

Also:

Mawby, R.I. and Walklate, S. (1994). Critical Victimology: International Perspectives. London: Sage.

Williams, B. (1999). Working with victims of crime: policies, politics and practice.London: Jessica Kingsley.

Williams, B. (2005). Victims of crime and community justice. London: Jessica Kingsley..

Useful Texts

Brant, C. & Too, Y. L. (1995). Rethinking Sexual Harassment. London: Pluto Press.

Davies, M.; Croall, H. & Tyer, J. (2005). Criminal Justice An Introduction to the Criminal Justice System, 3rd Edition. London: Pearson Education.

Fattah, E. A. (1988). From Crime Policy to Victim Policy. London: Macmillan.

Gelsthorpe, L. & Morris, M. (1990). Feminist Perspectives in Criminology. Buckingham: Open University Press.

Hester, M.; Kelly, L. & Radford, J. (1996). Women, Violence and Male Power. Buckingham: Open University Press.

Hester, M.; Kelly, L. & Radford, J. (1996). Women, Violence and Male Power. Buckingham: Open University Press.

Maguire, M. & Pointing, J. (1986). Victims of Crime: A New Deal? Buckingham: Open University Press.

Matthews, R. & Young, J. (1986). Confronting Crime. London: Sage Publications.

Mawby, R. I. & Walklate, S. (1994). Critical Victimology: International Perspectives. London: Sage.

Radford, J.; Friedberg, M. & Harne, L. (2000). Women, Violence and Strategies for Action. Buckingham: Open University Press.

Treadwell, J. (2006). Criminology. London: Sage Publications.

Walklate, S. (2004). Gender, Crime and Criminal Justice. London: Willan.

Walklate, S. (2006). Imagining the Victims of Crime. Buckingham: Open University Press.

Walklate, S. (2007). Handbook of Victims and Victimology. London: Willan.

Walklate, S. (2007). Understanding Criminology. Buckingham: Open University Press.

Watts, R; Bessant, J. & Hill, R. (2008). International Criminology: A Critical Introduction. London: Routledge.

Suggested Reading for Assessment Preparation – Please note, you are not expected to complete all these readings! The list is here for you to browse through, to identify useful texts for your assessment preparation. I will also be on hand to provide further guidance if required.

Angle, H., Malam, S. and Carey, C. (2003) Key findings from the Witness

Satisfaction Survey 2002. Home Office Research Findings no. 189. London:

Home Office.

Bottomley, A.K. and Pease, K. (1996) Crime and punishment: interpreting the data.Milton Keynes: Open University Press.

Bottomley, K. and Coleman, C. (1981) Understanding Crime Rates: Police and Public Roles in the Production of Official Statistics. London: Gower Publishers.

Bowling, B. & Philips, C. (2002). Race, crime and criminal justice. Harlow: Longman.

Braithwaite, J. (2002) Restorative justice and responsive regulation. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Braithwaite, J. (1989) Crime, shame and reintegration. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Cavadino, M., Crow, I. and Dignan, J. (1999) Criminal justice 2000: strategies for a new century. Winchester: Waterside Press.

Cavadino, M and Dignan, J. (Eds) (2002) The Penal System: An Introduction(3rd ed). London: Sage Publications.

Cavadino, M. and Dignan, J. (1997) ‘Reparation, retribution and rights’, International Review of Victimology, vol. 4, p 233-253.

Christie, N. (1977) ‘Conflicts as property’, British Journal of Criminology, vol. 17, no.1, p 1-15.

Clarke, R.V.G. and Cornish, D.B. (1985) ‘Modelling offenders decisions: a

framework for research and policy’, in Tonry, M. and Morris, N. (Eds) Crime and Justice, vol. 6. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, p 147-186.

Coleman, C. and Moynihan, J. (1996) Understanding Crime Data: Haunted by the Dark Figure. Milton Keynes: Open University Press.

Crawford, A. and Goodey, J. (Eds) (2000) Integrating a Victim Perspective within Criminal Justice: International Debates. Aldershot: Ashgate Dartmouth.

Crawford, A., Jones, T. Woodhouse, T. and Young, J. (1990) Second Islington Crime Survey. London: Centre for Criminology, Middlesex Polytechnic.

Crawford, A. and Newburn, T. (2003) Youth Offending and Restorative Justice: Implementing Reform in Youth Justice. Cullompton: Willan Publishing.

Davies, P. Francis, P. and Jupp, V. (Eds) (2003) Victimisation – Theory, Research and Policy. Basingstoke: Pargrave Macmillan.

Davies, P. Francis, P. and Jupp, V. (2003) ‘Victimology, victimisation and public policy’ in P. Davies, P. Francis and V. Jupp (Eds) Victimisation – Theory,Research and Policy. Basingstoke: Pargrave Macmillan, p 1-27.

Davies, P., Francis, P. and Jupp, V. (1997) Understanding Victimisation.

Northumbria: Northumbria Social Science Press.

Davies, P., Francis, P., &. Jupp, V. (2003) Victimisation: Theory, Research and Policy. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Davies, P., Francis, P., & Greer. C. (2008). Victims, Crime and Society. London: Sage.

Davis, C., Lurigio, A. and Skogan, W. (Eds) (1997) Victims of Crime(2nd ed).

Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications.

Dignan, J. (2005) Understanding Victims and Restorative Justice. Berkshire: Open University Press.

Dignan, J. (2000) Youth Justice Pilots Evaluation: Interim Report on Reparative Work and Youth Offending Teams. London: Home Office.

Dignan, J. (1999) ‘The Crime and Disorder Act and the prospects for restorative justice’, Criminal Law Review, p 48-60.

Dignan, J. and Cavadino, M. (1996) ‘Towards a framework for conceptualising and evaluating models of criminal justice from a victim’s perspective’, International Review of Victimology, vol. 4, p 153-182.

Ditton, J. and Farrall, S. (2000) The fear of crime. Aldershot: Ashgate Dartmouth.

Downes, D. and Rock, P. (1998) Understanding Deviance – A Guide to the Sociology of Crime and Rule Breaking.(3rd ed) Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Edwards, I. (2001) ‘Victim participation in sentencing; the problems of incoherence’, The Howard Journal, vol. 40, no. 1, p 39-54.

Farrell, G. ‘Multiple victimisation: its extent and significance’ in T. Newburn (Ed) Key Readings in CriminologyCollumpton: Willan

Fenwick, H. (1995) ‘Rights of victims in the criminal justice system: rhetoric or

reality?’ Criminal Law Review, p 843-53.

Godfrey, B. and Lawrence, P. (2005) Crime and Justice 1750-1950. Cullompton: Willan Publishing

Goldson, B. (ed) (2000) The New Youth Justice. Dorset: Russel House Publishing.

Goodey, Jo. (2005) Victims and victimology: Research, Policy and Practice. Essex: Pearson.

Heidensohn, F. and Gelsthorpe, L. (2007) ‘Gender and Crime’, in M. Maguire, R. Morgan and R. Reiner (Eds.) The Oxford Handbook of Criminology. (4th ed)

Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 381 – 420

HEUNI (1989) Changing Victim Policy: The United Nations Victim Declaration and Recent Developments in Europe. Helsinki: HEUNI, no. 16.

Holdaway, S., Davidson, N., Dignan, J., Hammersley, R., Hine, J. and Marsh, P. (2001) New Strategies to Address Youth Offending the National Evaluation of thePilot Youth Offending Teams. RDS Occasional Paper No. 69. London: The Research, Development and Statistics Directorate.

Home Office (2005) A Code of Practice for Victims of Crime. London: Criminal

Justice Reform

Home Office (2003) A new deal for victims and witnesses: national strategy to deliver improved services. London: Home Office Communications Directorate.

Home Office (2003) Valuing the Victim: An Inspection into national Victim Contact Arrangements. HM Inspectorate of Probation: Thematic Inspection Report.London: Home Office.

Home Office (2001) A Review of the Victim’s Charter. London: Home Office.

Home Office (1999) Digest 4: Information on the Criminal Justice System in England and Wales. London: Home Office.

Home Office (1996) The Victim’s Charter: A Statement of Service Standards for Victims of Crime. London: Home Office.

Home Office (1990) Victim’s Charter: A Statement of the Rights of Victims of Crime. London: Home Office.

Hopkins-Burke, R. (2001) An Introduction to Criminological Theory. Cullompton: Willan Publishing.

Hough, M. and Mayhew, P. (1983) The British Crime Survey, 1st Report, London: Home Office Research and Planning Unit.

Hoyle, C., Morgan, R. and Sanders, A. (1999) The Victim’s Charter: An Evaluation of Pilot Projects. Home Office Research Findings no. 107. London: Home Office.

Hoyle, C. and Sanders, A. (2000) ‘Police responses to domestic violence: from victim choice to victim empowerment?British Journal of Criminology, vol 40, no. 14, p.

Jones, T., MacLean, B. and Young, J. (1986) The Islington Crime Survey:

Victimisation and Policing in Inner-City London. London: Gower Publishers.

JUSTICE (1998) Victims in Criminal Justice. Report of the JUSTICE Committee on the Role of the Victim in Criminal Justice. London: JUSTICE.

Kershaw, C. (2001) The British Crime Survey: First Results, England and Wales. London: Government Statistical Service.

Koffman, L. (1996) Crime Surveys and the Victims of Crime. Cardiff: University of Wales Press.

Johnstone, G., & Van Ness, D.W. (2006). Handbook of Restorative Justice.

Cullompton: Willan.

Karmen, A. (2004). Crime Victims: An Introduction to Victimology. London: Thomson.

Lea, J. and Young, J. (1993) What is to be done about Law And Order? Crisis in the Nineties. London: Pluto Press.

Lea, J. and Young, J. (1984) What is to be done about Law and Order? Crisis in the Eighties. London: Penguin.

Liebmann, M. (2000) ‘History and overview of mediation in the UK’, in M. Liebmann (ed) Mediation in Context. London: Jessica Kingsley.

Lurigio, A., Skogan, W. and Davis, R. (Eds) (1990) Victims of Crime: Problems, Policies and Programs.London: Sage Publications.

Maguire, M. and Corbett, C. (1987) The Effects of Crime and the Work of Victim Support Schemes. Aldershot: Gower Publications.

Maguire, M. and Kynch, J. (2000) Victim Support: Findings from the 1998 British Crime Survey. Home Office Research Findings no. 117. London: Home Office.

Maguire, M. and Pointing, J. (1988) Victims of Crime: A New Deal?Milton Keynes: Open University Press.

Marshall, T. (1999) Restorative Justice: An Overview. London: Home Office.

Marshall, A.F. and Merry, S. (1990) Crime and Accountability: Victim/Offender

Mediation in Practice. London: Home Office.

Mawby, R.I. and Walklate, S. (1994) Critical Victimology. London: Sage Publications.

Mayhew, P, Elliott, D and Dowds, L. (1989) The British Crime Survey, 3rd Report, London: Home Office Research and Planning Unit.

Mayhew, P, Mirrlees-Black, C. and Aye Maung, N. (1994) Trends in crime: Findings from the 1994 British Crime Survey. Home Office Research and StatisticsDirectorate, Research Findings No. 14. London: Home Office.

Mayhew, P, Aye Maung, N. and Mirrlees-Black, C. (1992) The British Crime Survey. London: Home Office Research and Planning Unit.

McConville, M. and Wilson, G. (ed) (2002) The Handbook of the Criminal Justice Process. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

McLaughlin, E. and Muncie, J. (Eds) (2001) The Sage Dictionary of Criminology. London: Sage Publications.

Miers, D., Maguire, M., Goldie, S., Sharpe, K., Hale, C., Netten, A., Uglow, S.,

Doolin, K., Hallam, A., Enterkin, J. and Newburn, T. (2001) An Exploratory

Evaluation of Restorative Justice Schemes. Paper 9. London: Home Office Crime Reduction Research Papers Series.

Mirrlees-Black, C. (2001) Confidence in the Criminal Justice System: Findings from the 2000 British Crime Survey. Home Office Research Findings no. 137. London:Home Office.

Mirrlees-Black, C (1998) The British Crime Survey, London: Home Office

Research, Development and Statistics Directorate.

Morgan, R. and Saunders, A. (1999) The Uses of Victim Statements. Occasional Paper. London: Home Office Research Development and Statistics Directorate.

Newburn, T., Masters, G., Earle, R., Goldie, S., Crawford, A., Sharpe, K., Netten, A., Hale, C., Uglow, S. and Saunders, R. (2001) The Introduction of Referral Ordersinto the Youth Justice System. Second Interim Report. RDS Occasional paper No. 73. London: Home Office.

Newburn, T., Masters, G., Earle, R., Goldie, S., Crawford, A., Sharpe, K., Netten, A., Hale, C., Uglow, S. and Saunders, R. (2001) The introduction of referral ordersinto the youth justice system. First Interim Report. RDS Occasional paper No. 70. London: Home Office.

Newton, E. (2003) ‘A study of the policies and procedures implemented by the

probation service with respect to victims of serious crime’, British Journal of

Community Justice,vol 2, no 1, summer, p 25-36.

Perry, B. (2003) Hate and Bias Crime. London: Routledge.

Plotnikoff, J. and Woolfson, R. (1998) Witness Care in Magistrates’ Courts and the Youth Court. Home Office Research Findings no. 68. London: Home Office.Roberts, A.R. (1990) Helping Crime Victims: Research, Policy and Practice. London:Sage Publications

Rock, P. (1993) The Social World and the English Crown Court. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

Rock, P. (1990) Helping Victims of Crime: The Home Office and the Rise of Victim Support in England and Wales. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

Rock, P. (2009) ‘On becoming a victim’ in T. Newburn (Ed.) Key Readings in

CriminologyCollumpton: Willan

Sebba, L. (2000) ‘The individualization of the victim: from positivism to

postmodernism, in A. Crawford and J. Goodey (Eds) Integrating a Victim

Perspective within Criminal Justice: International Debates. Aldershot: Ashgate

Dartmouth, p 55-76.

Shapland, J. (2009) ‘Fiefs and peasants: accomplishing change for victims in the criminal justice system’ in T. Newburn (Ed.) Key Readings in Criminology

Cullompton: Willan

Shapland, J. and Bell, E. (1998) ‘Victims in the Magistrates’ Courts and Crown

Court’ Criminal Law Review, p 537-546.

Shapland, J., Willmore, J. and Duff, P. (1985) Victims in the Criminal Justice System. Aldershot: Gower Publishing.

Sims, L. and Myhill, A. (2001) Policing and the Public: Findings from the 2000 British Crime Survey. Home Office Research Findings no. 136. London: Home Office.

Spalek B (2003) ‘Victim work in the probation service: perpetuating notions of an ideal victim’ in M. Nellis & W. H. Chui (Eds) Moving Probation Forward: Evidence,Arguments, Practice. Harlow: Longman.

Spalek, B. (2006) Crime Victims: Theory, Policy and Practice. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Sparks, R. F., (1988) Surveying Victims: A Study of the Measurement of Criminal Victimisation,Chichester: Wiley.

Sgarzi, J.M. and McDevitt, J. (2003). Victimology: A Study of Crime Victims and Their Roles. New Jersey: Pearson.

Tarling, R. (2000) Victim and Witness Intimidation: Findings from the British Crime Survey. London: Home Office.

United Nations (1990) Guide for Practitioners Regarding the Implementation of the Declaration of Basic Principles of Justice for Victims of Crime and Abuse of Power. Eighth United Nations Congress on the prevention of crime and thetreatment of offenders. United Nations: Havana.

van Dijk, J. (2000) ‘Implications of the International Crime Victims Survey for a victim perspective’, in A. Crawford and J. Goodey (Eds) Integrating a Victim Perspectivewithin Criminal Justice: International Debates. Aldershot: Ashgate Dartmouth, p97-122.

Walklate, S. (Ed.) (2007) Handbook of Victims and VictimologyCollumpton: Willan

Walklate, S. (2002) ‘So who are the victims now?’, British Journal of Community Justice, vol 1, no 1 spring, p 47-64.

Walklate, S. (1989) Victimology: The Victim and the Criminal Justice Process.

London: Unwin Hyman.

Williams, B. (ed) (2002) Reparation and Victim-Focused Social Work. London:

Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

Williams, B. (2002) ‘Justice for Victims of Crime’ in Ward, D. Scott, J. & Lacey, M. (Eds) Probation: Working for justice. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Williams, B. (1999) Working with Victims of Crime: Policies, Politics and Practice. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

Williams, B. (1999) ‘The Victim’s Charter: Citizens as consumers of criminal justice services’, The Howard Journal, vol. 38, no. 4, p 384-396.

Williams, K. S. (2001) Textbook on Criminology. (4th ed) Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Walklate, S. (2007). Imagining the Victim of Crime. Maidenhead: Open University.

Walklate, S. (ed.) (2007). Handbook of Victims and Victimology. Cullompton: Willan.

Wright, M. (1991) Justice for Victims and Offenders: A Restorative Response to Crime. (2nd ed) Winchester; Waterside.

Wright, M. (1995) ‘Victims, mediation and criminal justice’ Criminal Law Review, p 187-199.

Zehr, H. (1990) Changing Lenses: A New Focus for Crime and Justice. Scottdale: Herald Press.

In addition, do not forget the wide range of excellent resources available through copyright cleared resources. These texts have been hand picked for their usefulness and importance for this module.

Applied Victimology: Weekly Details

Week

Subject Area

Topic

Core Reading – unless stated, these are all available as a copyright cleared resource

1

 

Introduction to course

 

Introduction to Victimology

Overview of course

Details of assignment & seminars

Introduction to module

Code of Conduct

 

  • What is a victim?

 

  • What is a witness?

 

  • What is victimisation?

No core reading for this week.

Please spend your time reading the module handbook.

2

 

 

 

 

Understanding the fear of CrimeThe politicisation of crime

Counting crime

Problems with crime figures

Understanding Hate Crime

Davies, M; Croall, H. & Tyrer, J. (2005). Criminal Justice, 3rd Edition. London: Pearson Education.

Chapter 3 pp 62 – 71

 

Also consider:

 

Maguire, M. & Pointing, J. (1988). Victims of Crime: A New Deal? London: Sage.

Genn, H. Multiple victimization pp 90-100.

 

3

 

 

 

 

Theories of Victimology: 1

 

Positivism

 

The use of quantitative crime methods to uncover the ‘dark’ figure of street crime

Victim typologies

Fattah, E. A. (1986). From Crime Policy to Victim Policy.

Christie, N. The ideal victim pp 1 – 17.

Also consider:

Mawby, R.I. and Walklate, S. (1994).

Critical Victimology: International Perspectives.

London: Sage.

Chapter 1 pp 1 – 22

 

Also consider:

 

Maguire, M. & Pointing, J. (1988). Victims of Crime: A New Deal? London: Routledge.

Genn, H. Multiple victimization pp 90-100.

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

Theories of Victimology: 2

 

Feminism

 

Activist led calls for social change

Uncovering crime in the home

Gelsthorpe, L. & Morris, M. (1990). Feminist Perspectives in Criminology. London: Routledge.

Smart, C. Feminist approaches to criminology: or postmodern woman meets atavistic man pp 70-84.

 

Also consider:

 

Lees, S. (1996). Unreasonable Doubt: The Outcomes of Rape Trials. In Hester, M; Kelly, L. & Radford, J. (Eds.). Women, Violence and Male Power pp 99 – 116. Buckingham: Open University Press.

 

5

 

 

Theories of Victimology: 3Right Realism

 

The politics of crime

The New Right

The breakdown of community

Walklate, S. (2007). Understanding Criminology: Current Theoretical Debates 3rd Edition.

Chapter 3: Understanding Right Realism 38 – 52.

Also consider:

Wolhuter, L; Olley, N. & Denham, D. (2009). Victimology: Victimisation and Victims’ Rights. London: Routledge.

Chapter 2 pp 17 – 23

Available as an e-book

6

 

 

 

 

Theories of Victimology: 4

Left Realism

The square of crime

The Islington Crime Survey

R. Matthews and J. Young. (1986). Confronting Crime. London: Routledge:

Young, J. The failure of criminology: the need for a radical realism pp 4-30.

 

Also consider:

 

Treadwell, J. (2006). Criminology. London: Sage.

Left Realism and Victimology pp 121 – 125.

 

Also consider:

 

Please read the article by Jock Young available from:

http://www.malcolmread.co.uk/JockYoung/RISK.htm

7

 

 

 

 

Mapping Issues of Crime

The geography of crime

Everyday management of public and private spaces

Feminist geography

Walklate, S. (2004). Gender, Crime and Criminal Justice.

Chapter 6 Gender the Law and Criminal Justice Policy pp 152 – 176.

 

Also consider:

 

Bowers, K. J.; Johnson, S. D. & Hirschfield, A. F. (2004). Closing Off Opportunities for Crime: An Evaluation of Alley-Gating. European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research, 10, 285 – 308

[Please retrieve this article via EBSCO]

 

8

 

 

 

 

Balancing Victims’ and Offenders’ Rights

Justice for victims and offenders

Rights and responsibilities

Goodey, J. (2005). Victims and victimology:

Research, policy and practice. Harlow: Pearson.

Chapter 6 pp 152 – 180

Available as an e-book

 

Also consider:

 

Walklate, S. (2006). Imagining the Victims of Crime. London: Routledge.

Radical Victimology pp 37 – 52.

 

 

9

 

 

 

 

Restorative Justice

 

What is restorative justice?

Who benefits?

Is it a ‘soft option’?

Dignan, J (2007). The Victim in Restorative Justice. In Walklate, S. (ed.) (2007). Handbook of Victims and Victimology. Cullompton: Willan.

Chapter 12 pp 309 – 331

Available as an e-book

 

Also consider:

 

Watts, R.; Bessant, J. & Hill, R. (2008). International Criminology: A Critical Introduction. London: McGraw.

Chapter 9: Victims and Victimology pp 169 – 186.

 

10

 

 

 

 

Case Study: 1

 

The Criminalisation of British Asian Youth

Goodey, J. (2001). The Criminalisation of British Asian Youth: Research from Bradford and Sheffield. Journal of Youth Studies, 4(4), pp 429 – 450

[Please retrieve this article via EBSCO]

 

11

 

 

 

 

Case Study: 2

Sexual Violence in the Workplace

 

Kitzinger, C. (1995). Anti-Lesbian Harassment. In Brant, C. & Too, Y.L. (Eds.). Rethinking Sexual Harassment pp 125 – 147. London: Pluto Press.

.

 

12

 

Module Review

 

 

Class led discussion on main themes of moduleNo additional core reading for this week. Instead, please use this week to catch up on readings you may have missed.

 

 

Comments ( 0 )

Animals are aware of their death just like humans do

This needs to be a critical analysis on the topic that animals are aware of their own death. the presentation attached shows a bullet that says humans are the only ones who are aware of their own death. I feel that this is wrong and need to write a critical analysis explaining how animals are aware of their death as well. It can consist of any animals, such as dogs, prime apes, elephants and dolphins, or all of them. I need to have scholarly articles and of PH.D quality.

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Family Issues Across the Lifespan FMLY 1020 Assignment 3 1 Assignment 3 Media Critique

Family Issues Across the Lifespan FMLY 1020 Assignment 3 1

Assignment 3

Media Critique

It has been well established that the media is a powerful socialization agent that has the ability to

shape our attitudes and values on a variety of issues. This includes the ability to shape our thinking

about family life. The requirement for this assignment is the preparation of a term paper that

critiques/evaluates the portrayal of the family in the media.

First consider how the family is portrayed in the media. This might include an examination of how

families are presented in popular television programs, movies, commercials, comic series, or books.

Choose only one specific medium (one book, movie, or television show). You should then

prepare an essay that evaluates the portrayal of the family in this medium in terms of whether or not

the portrayal is realistic. The critique must be supported by references in the literature that illustrate

the realities of family life.

The paper should be limited to 5 typed double-spaced pages using 12 point font and one inch

margins, should be written in APA style (indent paragraphs and do not use an extra space between

paragraphs) and should resemble the following format:

I. Introduction (Essay of 1–2 paragraphs)

A. Introduce the topic and state the purpose of the paper.

B. Provide a brief description of the medium that you are evaluating. What is the plot or

storyline, and who are the major characters?

II. Critique/Literature review (Essay of approx. 4 pages)

A. Using specific examples from the medium that you have chosen, discuss the portrayal of the

family. Does the portrayal reflect reality? Use findings from the literature to support what you say

about whether or not this portrayal of family life is realistic. For example, if you say that a particular

program is not realistic because it does not reflect the financial reality of most families, then you

should provide support for the fact that most families do not have the financial resources portrayed

in the medium.

B. Be sure that the literature reviewed is relevant to the component of the media portrayal of

family life that you are addressing.

C. Your critique/literature review must include at least 5 references, 2 of which must be

research articles from academic journals. Journal of Marriage and Families, Family

Relations, and Journal of Family Issues are journals that are commonly used to report on

research in the field of family studies. These journals are available through the University of

Manitoba Libraries. However, you do not need to limit your search to these journals. Many

other appropriate journals may be found by searching through University of Manitoba

Libraries. Refer to the information in Assignment 1 for more details. Limit your search to

peer reviewed” articles. You should also take advantage of your free 4 month subscription

to InfoTrac® College Edition. After you register, you can log on and search for reference

material. New users can click on “Infotrac Demo” in order to get information on conducting

searches. All references used must have been published within the last ten years.

Do not search for information about the media. Use findings from the literature and research to

support what you say about the reality of family life.

D. Do not merely make a paragraph for each research article that looks like one abstract after

another. Integrate the results and conclusions of the researchers and relate these findings to

your topic. Interpret any quotations used.

III. Conclusions (Essay of approx.1 page)

A. Based on your examination of the media portrayal of family life and your review of the

literature, what conclusions can you draw? For example, is the portrayal realistic? What are Family Issues Across the Lifespan FMLY 1020 Assignment 3 2

the implications of such a portrayal?

IV. References (Separate page—not included in 5-page limit)

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Government Waste and Fraud circa 2012

Government Waste and Fraud circa 2012

The Paper is to be at least twelve (12) total pages of text,(not including Title Page, Table of Contents/Index or Bibliography), in  double-spaced, Times New Roman font in 12-point type, with one-inch margins, using the WORD or Wordperfect word processing program.

Grading emphasis for this segment will be placed on: (a) the depth, degree of originality, and the current nature of your material; (b)the organization and logical presentation of the material in appropriate business form;  (c) the extent of expression of your own thought process; and (d) the quality of your professional writing skills.

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NUTRITION MACRONUTRIENT AND MICRONUTRIENT COURSEWORK

Coursework:  40% of module mark.  Discussed week 9 in tutorial, Computer workshop sessions weeks 11-12 in tutorial time, in COMPUTER LAB.

Work is due in by 4pm week 17 on Tuesday 20th November 2012 to i-zone/parth-G (Llandaff). Mark for attention of Dr Ruth Fairchild. Front with a completed (green) submissions sheet.

 

Record your own food (and drink) intake, together with your physical activity diary for at least a 3 day period (include at least one weekend day), using either weighed or estimated intake method and analyse it on the dietary assessment package called WISP. This can be found on all open access computers in Llandaff – search for WISP and ensure you are using NetWISP 3.0.

 

A basic guide on how to use Wisp is on Blackboard.  You will need to enter your username (student number), but there is no need to enter your individual password to access the Blackboard module. The password for this programme for everybody is ‘****’.

 

Food codes and portion size data can be found in texts available from Llandaff Library – Composition of foods/food atlas and food portion sizes, see the module handbook/booklist for more details. Take weights from pre-packed or loose weight foods that you eat.

 

Provide your dietary analysis outputs as indicated overleaf and discuss:

 

  1. The healthiness of your diet compared to the DRV’s for your age/gender group, and any other general dietary advice appropriate to you.  Discuss nutrients falling below the LRNI or more than 200% above the RNI, including what the likely effects of this may be. Incorporate charts etc from WISP within this discussion.  See below for examples of data.

 

  1. How your physical activity level relates to present UK recommendations from a named source and how this is reflected in your energy requirement and intake.

 

  1. Based on 1 and 2 evaluate how well the present ‘Eatwell’ range of foods offered by Cardiff Met catering meets your dietary requirements.  How could you adapt the ‘Eatwell’ options on offer in order to better meet your DRV’s, in terms particularly of energy, fat, and salt. (Basic details of the CMU ‘Eatwell’ scheme are given on BB)

 

 

Your report must contain the following figures and they should be large enough to read!

  • A list of the foods eaten, in the form of your original handwritten notes (in an appendix) and as input into Netwisp showing foods, codes and portion sizes.

 

Appendix 1: Raw data: dietary diary example

 

Appendix 2  Example of list of the foods eaten, with their codes and portion sizes from Netwisp (use print screen to copy or scan printout into document) – ensure you provide a list of all the foods you input.

 

 

  • The pie chart showing your % energy derived from macronutrients (see below).

Figure 1: Example of Pie chart (can be pasted from WISP)

 

 

  • The bar graph (preferable) or table showing your intake of macro and micronutrients compared to the DRV’s.

Figure 2 Example of DRV data as bar graph (can be pasted from WISP)

 

 

Figure 2a Example of Table of Macronutrient & energy intakes (use Print screen to copy).

 

 

  • A printed (or pasted) indication of your activity levels:

 

Figure 3 Example of activity log  (use print screen to copy)

 

 

 

Other Wisp outputs: (use Print screen to copy) only include other charts available on NetWisp if they are discussed in the text.

 

 

 

 

Plagiarism will lead to a 0% mark. For advice on how to avoid plagiarism and reference correctly using the Harvard system see Study Advice Llandaff : http://portal.uwic.ac.uk/units/lis/resources/asr/CitRef/Documents/The%20Harvard%20system%20of%20referencing%20and%20citation.pdf

 

You MUST submit your work, via Blackboard to Turnitin UWIC’s electronic plagiarism checker.  This will be available from 1st October, leaving you time to correct your assignment before handing in. I will not use Turnitin to mark your work so YOU MUST SUBMIT A SINGLE PAPER COPY OF YOUR ASSIGNMENT THROUGH THE i-zone  HATCH.

Points for discussion in tutorial week 9 and in workshops weeks 11-12:

 

  • dietary survey methods
  • ‘normal’ consumption
  • coding and portions of food
  • foods eaten frequently
  • foods not in database
  • vitamin/protein supplements etc
  • height and weight, activity level
  • choice of nutrients to discuss
  • what do I talk about if my diet is ‘perfect’
  • what do you mean by ‘general dietary advice’
  • any questions?
  • Word limit 1000 words + 10%, not including tables and figures.
  •  You must give a word count.                                                                           

 

 

 

 

Questions arising during the undertaking of this work: please use discussion board on BB for all CW queries to ensure answers are consistent to all students.

 

 

 

 

 

RMF/09/12

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Archaeology – Egyptian Pyramids| Introduction and the Literature Review

Only the Introduction and the Literature Review including just three of the five references are due when
the rough draft is due. The paper in its entirety is due on the date announced in class.
AAA Style Assignment Instructions: This assignment must be typed in Arial, Calibri, or Times New Roman font size 12, have regular margins and be double spaced with pages numbered. Multiple grammar/spelling/sentence construction mistakes will result in a lower grade (edit your paper!) Your proposal should include only the following components: A properly heading followed by Introduction, Literature Review, Methods, and References sections.
1. A properly headed first page (do not use a cover page/graphics) should include the following in the upper right hand corner of your paper:
Your Name
Draft Number 1 (or Final Draft)
Title (this should give the reader a good idea what you project is about)
Date
2. For the body of the work you will provide four sections which will be separated only by the headings Introduction, Literature Review, Methods, and References.
3. For the Introduction, explain the topic and culture you have chosen. Explain to the reader how your paper will add some type of new insight into the community or group you would hypothetically examine. Within these opening paragraphs there must be a clear statement of the research question. You may use such verbiage as “The topic of this paper centers on examining…” or “The goal of this work is to elucidate…” or “The research questions driving this inquiry are…” The research question is the goal of your project and it is what you would be trying to find out the answer to with your archaeological methods.
Operationalize any variables. By this, I mean explain any important parts of your topic such as telling me who the group or culture is you are focusing on.
4. For the Literature Review, incorporate and in-text cite at least five scholarly (NOT about.com, wikipedia.org, or newspaper) journal articles on the group and methods you wish you study. For each of these articles, in your summary you should explicate their research question, methodology, and conclusions making sure to show how the article you chose relates to your research. Below is an example on an in-text citation.
According to King et. al (1997:165) “the purpose of citations is to credit original work, show relationships to the author’s methods and findings, and enable readers to locate sources (Biebuyck, 1992).”
5. In the Methods section, discuss the details of the archaeological methods you would hypothetically use to conduct your study. What would be the context of your study? The setting? Location? What data will you sample? Would you be dating anything? If so, what dating methods would be appropriate? What types of artifacts, ecofacts, features, sites would you use? Could you use garbology? How would you gather artifacts?
6. Your References page (an in-text citations) must be in AAA style for References and citations:

http://www.aaanet.org/publications/style_guide.pdf

References
King, Cynthia, Deborah McGuire, Alice Longman, Rose Mary Carrol-Johnson
2007 Peer Review, Authorship, Ethics, and Conflict of Interest. Journal of Nursing Scholarship 29(2):163-168.

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Write a 200- to 300-word response describing a four tier state court system. Compare that system with the federal court system. How do these two systems differ by structure, source of laws, and the types of cases that are heard.

Write a 200- to 300-word response describing a four tier state court system.  Compare that system with the federal court system. How do these two systems differ by structure, source of laws, and the types of cases that are heard.

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Choose an issue (such as, unemployment, homelessness, climate change, mental health, child abuse, asylum seekers/refugees, domestic violence, ageing population, poverty/economic disadvantage, racism, oppressive practices/laws, gender inequalities) and critically discuss: – The nature and purpose of social work, with reference to social work's actual or potential role in addressing the issue. – Historical and contemporary debates within social work, and their potential influence on the issue. – Social, political, and global influences on contemporary Australian social work practice and the issue. – How your developing practice might be influenced from your reflections on social work and this issue.

Choose an issue (such as, unemployment, homelessness, climate change, mental health, child abuse, asylum seekers/refugees, domestic violence, ageing population, poverty/economic disadvantage, racism, oppressive practices/laws, gender inequalities) and critically discuss:

- The nature and purpose of social work, with reference to social work’s actual or potential role in addressing the issue.

- Historical and contemporary debates within social work, and their potential influence on the issue.

- Social, political, and global influences on contemporary Australian social work practice and the issue.

- How your developing practice might be influenced from your reflections on social work and this issue.

In preparing this paper you need to demonstrate a capacity to identify, integrate and critically evaluate competing positions on social work and consider social work’s role in addressing the issue. Papers need to be logical, well thought-through, and well researched and referenced

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Your team has been tasked with preparing a presentation about physical evidence to a group of police rookies who have not yet worked in the forensics field. In your main posts, explain the process of examination of physical evidence and the significance of physical evidence. Use one researched case to illustrate the significance of physical evidence

Your team has been tasked with preparing a presentation about physical evidence to a group of police rookies who have not yet worked in the forensics field.
In your main posts, explain the process of examination of physical evidence and the significance of physical evidence.
Use one researched case to illustrate the significance of physical evidence

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Noble cause corruption in the Red Cross

Briefly cover the beginning of the Red Cross.
Touch on the following:

•    Various local chapter level scandals dealing with mishandling of donated funds, to include the funds not being given to the intended victims, and embezzlement.
•    9/11 controversy, the Red Cross held back more than half of the donations that were supposed to disbursed to the victims.
•    Katrina controversy, the Red Cross made false promises of financial payments, refused to except volunteers, they were even kicked out of a center in suburban Atlanta. Despite its fundraising FEMA is reimbursing funds to the Red Cross.

Make sure you cover what would happen if the problems of the past were repeated.

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